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chibird:

With much sadness, it was announced that Studio Ghibli will be -briefly pausing- its animation production department. [EDIT: The news is not final.] Their films have been some of my favorites, and their characters have inspired me since childhood. Here’s to them and the wonderful stories they have given us.

chibird:

With much sadness, it was announced that Studio Ghibli will be -briefly pausing- its animation production department. [EDIT: The news is not final.] Their films have been some of my favorites, and their characters have inspired me since childhood. Here’s to them and the wonderful stories they have given us.

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recoveryisbeautiful:

Hungry: 
If your body is asking for food, the hunger will gradually develop. Emotional hunger is a response to some sort of negative experience or feeling and is usually more of a sudden onset of a craving for a specific food. With emotional hunger you will also feel the need to eat immediately. If you’re still not sure, wait a few minutes and see what happens. As you do this more and more it will become easier for you to distinguish between the two.
Angry:
One thing that can help with anger is feeling a sense of power. Things like running, dancing, or other strong physical activities are a great way to get that energy out of your body. Depending on what works for you- you may also want to try something more calming. Slow down, let your mind relax… sometimes that can help you to organize your thoughts which may bring on the realization that whatever your angry about isn’t all that bad or is something you can work on by staying focused. Don’t forget to address your anger. None of this means to disregard it, push it back, or try to completely forget about it. You can’t bottle these things up inside. What you want to do is calm yourself, release that negative energy, and organize your thoughts so you can handle the anger in a safe and effective way.
Lonely:
If you’re lonely, reach out to someone. Text, phone, video chat, in person. Even just going outside for a walk or going to a coffee shop with your laptop.You don’t always have to be directly socializing with people as long as you’re around them. Short term loneliness is sometimes alleviated by simply being in the presence of other people.
Tired:
If you’re tired, take a look at your schedule. Are you overworking yourself? You may need to make set times within your schedule to take a break. Scheduling breaks may sound weird… but you need it. Don’t burn yourself out. Don’t take on more than you can handle.Also take a look at your sleep schedule. Are you getting the rest you need? Maybe you need to set an earlier time to get to bed in order to wake up feeling refreshed. Your body will thank you.The last thing is that you can’t be afraid take time for yourself or say no to things. 

recoveryisbeautiful:

Hungry: 

If your body is asking for food, the hunger will gradually develop. Emotional hunger is a response to some sort of negative experience or feeling and is usually more of a sudden onset of a craving for a specific food. With emotional hunger you will also feel the need to eat immediately. 
If you’re still not sure, wait a few minutes and see what happens. As you do this more and more it will become easier for you to distinguish between the two.

Angry:

One thing that can help with anger is feeling a sense of power. Things like running, dancing, or other strong physical activities are a great way to get that energy out of your body. 
Depending on what works for you- you may also want to try something more calming. Slow down, let your mind relax… sometimes that can help you to organize your thoughts which may bring on the realization that whatever your angry about isn’t all that bad or is something you can work on by staying focused. 
Don’t forget to address your anger. None of this means to disregard it, push it back, or try to completely forget about it. You can’t bottle these things up inside. What you want to do is calm yourself, release that negative energy, and organize your thoughts so you can handle the anger in a safe and effective way.

Lonely:

If you’re lonely, reach out to someone. Text, phone, video chat, in person. Even just going outside for a walk or going to a coffee shop with your laptop.
You don’t always have to be directly socializing with people as long as you’re around them. Short term loneliness is sometimes alleviated by simply being in the presence of other people.

Tired:

If you’re tired, take a look at your schedule. Are you overworking yourself? You may need to make set times within your schedule to take a break. Scheduling breaks may sound weird… but you need it. Don’t burn yourself out. Don’t take on more than you can handle.
Also take a look at your sleep schedule. Are you getting the rest you need? Maybe you need to set an earlier time to get to bed in order to wake up feeling refreshed. Your body will thank you.
The last thing is that you can’t be afraid take time for yourself or say no to things. 

(via finding-happiness-in-the-dark)

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etcetera-drawings:

i’m tired.

i`m on my way  (^▽^)

etcetera-drawings:

i’m tired.

i`m on my way  (^▽^)

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pryce14:

Red X for today’s warmup  - 45 min

wooow!+A

pryce14:

Red X for today’s warmup  - 45 min

wooow!+A

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if someone hates you for no reason, give that mother fucker a reasonimage

 

Tags: hate
Photoset

You thought we could be decent men in an indecent time! But you were wrong. The world is cruel.

(Source: thedarknightbale, via cybermax)

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libutron:

Brachystelma gerrardii | ©Lourens Grobler   (Near Wakkerstroom, Mpumalanga, South Africa)
Brachystelma gerrardii (Gentianales - Apocynaceae) is a South African plant exceptionally rare, with subpopulations usually consisting of no more than 10 mature individuals. Locally it is considered a threatened species [1].
There are black and blue-green metallic color forms of Brachystelma gerrardii flowers. This black one is common in the more northerly reaches of the distribution area [2].

libutron:

Brachystelma gerrardii | ©Lourens Grobler   (Near Wakkerstroom, Mpumalanga, South Africa)

Brachystelma gerrardii (Gentianales - Apocynaceae) is a South African plant exceptionally rare, with subpopulations usually consisting of no more than 10 mature individuals. Locally it is considered a threatened species [1].

There are black and blue-green metallic color forms of Brachystelma gerrardii flowers. This black one is common in the more northerly reaches of the distribution area [2].

(via science-junkie)

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science-junkie:

Heroin, addiction and free willby Vaughan Bell
The death of Phillip Seymour Hoffman has sparked some strong and seemingly contradictory responses. What these reactions show is that many people find it hard to think of addiction as being anything except either a choice or a loss of free will.
The fact that addiction could involve an active choice to take drugs but still be utterly irresistible seems difficult for most people to fathom.
Let’s take some reactions from the media. Over at Time, David Sheff wrotethat “it wasn’t Hoffman’s fault that he relapsed. It was the fault of a disease”. On the other hand, at Deadspin, Tim Grierson wrote that the drug taking was “thoughtless and irresponsible, leaving behind three children and a partner”.
So does addiction trap people within its claws or do drug users die from their own actions? It’s worth noting that this is a politicised debate. Those who favour a focus on social factors prefer prefer the ‘trap’ idea, those who prefer to emphasise individual responsibility like the ‘your own actions’ approach.
Those who want to tread the middle ground or aim to be diplomatic suggest it’s ‘half and half’ – but actually it’s both at the same time, and these are not, as most people believe, contradictory explanations.
To start, it’s worth thinking about how heroin has its effect at all. Heroin is metabolised to morphine which then binds to opioid receptors in the brain. It seems to be the effects in the nucleus accumbens and limbic systemwhich are associated with the pleasure and reward associated with the drug.
But in terms of motivating actions, it is a remarkably non-specific drug and it doesn’t directly cause specific behaviours.
Read More

science-junkie:

Heroin, addiction and free will
by Vaughan Bell

The death of Phillip Seymour Hoffman has sparked some strong and seemingly contradictory responses. What these reactions show is that many people find it hard to think of addiction as being anything except either a choice or a loss of free will.

The fact that addiction could involve an active choice to take drugs but still be utterly irresistible seems difficult for most people to fathom.

Let’s take some reactions from the media. Over at Time, David Sheff wrotethat “it wasn’t Hoffman’s fault that he relapsed. It was the fault of a disease”. On the other hand, at Deadspin, Tim Grierson wrote that the drug taking was “thoughtless and irresponsible, leaving behind three children and a partner”.

So does addiction trap people within its claws or do drug users die from their own actions? It’s worth noting that this is a politicised debate. Those who favour a focus on social factors prefer prefer the ‘trap’ idea, those who prefer to emphasise individual responsibility like the ‘your own actions’ approach.

Those who want to tread the middle ground or aim to be diplomatic suggest it’s ‘half and half’ – but actually it’s both at the same time, and these are not, as most people believe, contradictory explanations.

To start, it’s worth thinking about how heroin has its effect at all. Heroin is metabolised to morphine which then binds to opioid receptors in the brain. It seems to be the effects in the nucleus accumbens and limbic systemwhich are associated with the pleasure and reward associated with the drug.

But in terms of motivating actions, it is a remarkably non-specific drug and it doesn’t directly cause specific behaviours.

Read More

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Cankins & Dondy